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About Co-operatives "Our Roots"

The Regina Community Clinic is unique.

The Regina Community Clinic is the only healthcare co-operative in southern Saskatchewan - one of four co-operative community clinics in Saskatchewan.

We not only provide wholistic primary healthcare to meet the needs of all our patients but also have the capacity and flexibility to highlight specific healthcare needs and tailor our services to meet the needs of specific populations within our  locality. 

The populations and health needs vary. These include Indigenous health, rural health, and refugee health.

Co-operative community clinics are capable of offering care and services to the most vulnerable populations which are often over-looked in the mainstream healthcare system.

For more information about co-operatives and healthcare co-operatives, please refer the document attached to the link below:

Healthcare Co-operative Information

The Co-operative Approach - The 7 Principles of Co-operation

The goal of a healthcare co-operative is not only to provide care for the patients’ physical and mental health but also services to provide social services and the well-being of their communities. Co-operative community clinics offer social and education services and programs to their members, patients, and members of the community in which they are located.

Co-operative community clinics offer multidisciplinary team-based approach to healthcare. Most community clinics have the resources to offer professional services on-site such as counselling, exercise therapy, social work, nutrition, and laboratory and x-ray services and more

The co-operative model is:

  • Based on the independence of individuals and communities
  • An effective tool to strengthen local economies
  • A proven way to improve the quality of life
  • Focuses on sustainable development
  • A model that encourages participation
  • Resilient in times of crisis

The 7 principles of co-operation:

  • Voluntary and open membership
  • Democratic member control
  • Member economic participation
  • Autonomy and independence
  • Education, training and information
  • Co-operation among co-operative
  • Concern for community

Co-operatives in Canada:

  • 9,000
  • 18 million members
  • 155,000 employees
  • More than $50 billion in annual revenues
A team-based, fiscally efficient and integrated approach to healthcare.

The team-based approach supports healthcare providers and lessens the possibility of burnout and enables providers to provide timely and quality care to their patients. High quality and timely care helps to reduce the stress on an already strained healthcare system, particularly as the population ages and health issues become more complex.

Co-operative community clinics offer a fiscally efficient, integrated approach to healthcare. They have demonstrated savings within the healthcare system by curbing demands on the larger system, and providing more patient-focused care.

Physicians and Nurse Practitioners are salaried and not fee-for-service.  As a result, patients receive longer appointment times along with a shorter wait time to receive a scheduled appointment and have access to different healthcare providers in the clinic. Patients have consistent healthcare which supports and increases the probability of positive outcomes.

Physicians and Nurse Practitioners are salaried and not fee-for-service. 

As a result, patients receive longer appointment times along with a shorter wait time to receive a scheduled appointment and have access to different healthcare providers in the clinic. Patients have consistent healthcare which supports and increases the probability of positive outcomes.

Members have input into the direction of the clinic via an elected Board of Directors. 

As a co-operative, members have input into the direction of the clinic via an elected Board of Directors.  All members have a vote at annual general meetings and can become board members.  There is a balanced approach to governance of these clinics: patients also have input and are partners in their healthcare.  

"Our Roots" The History of Cooperatives and Community Health Clinics in Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan health care co-operatives were created during the crisis brought about by the provincial government’s implementation of a universal health care system and the doctor’s strike in 1962.  It was at this time of turmoil that communities took matters in their own hands.

To meet their own health care needs, concerned citizens formed health care co-operatives and before the end of the strike, community clinics were formed around the province. 

The Regina Community clinic (RCC) is operated governed by Community Health Services (Regina) Association Ltd., a not for profit charitable health care co-operative founded in 1962 by pro-medicare doctors and citizens. There are four similar associations in Saskatchewan united under the Community Health Co-operative Federation.